चे

चेतःक्षीरपयोधिमन्थनचलद्रागाख्यमन्थाचल-
क्षोभव्यापृतिसम्भवां जननि ते मन्दस्मितश्रीसुधाम्।
स्वादं स्वादम् उदीतकौतुकरसं नेत्रत्रयी शाङ्करी
श्रीकामाक्षि निरन्तरं परिरमत्यानन्दवीचीमयी॥

cetaḥkṣīrapayodhi-manthana-calad-rāgākhya-manthācala-
kṣobha-vyāpṛti-saṁbhavaāṁ janani te mandasmitaśrīsudhām|
svādaṁ svādam udītakautukarasaṁ netratrayī śāṅkarī
śrīkāmākṣi nirantaraṁ pariramatyānandavīcīmayī||4 - 97||

Poets describe with colors, for eg, anger is red; Smile, laugh, fame and truth are white in color.

Goddess Kamakshi's mind is like the milk-ocean, which is being churned by desire/manthara mountain. From this oean rises her smile which is like nectar. Siva's 3 eyes which resemble the waves of happiness, take pleasure in drinking this nectar again and again. When Kamakshi thinks about lord Siva, desire in her mind makes her smile beautifully. Lord Siva in turn looks at her with all three eyes and experiences immense pleasure.

3 Comments:

  1. Ramesh Abhiraman said...
    Beautiful imagery by Muka kavi. The last word reminds me of another sloka by him "AryAm Eva viBhAvayan...Arohatyapavarga sowDhabhalabhIm AnandavIcImayIm"
    Visalakshi said...
    Welcome to our blog! Muka Kavi's words have attracted many scholars because of the nature of outpouring that can be compared to Leela Suka's Krishnakarnamrtam.
    Ramesh Abhiraman said...
    "Kavyakantha" Ganapathi Muni was given the title at a Sanskrit conference at Nawadeep, where as a lone Southerner, and a young scholar, he astounded the assembled old guard. He was tested with quizzes. One of them, to compose a verse ending in "pipIlikA cumbati candra mandalam" (the ant kissed the moon). He shot back:
    "satI viyogEna viShaNNa cEtasa: prabho: shayAnasya himAlayE girou |
    shivasya cooDAkalitam sudhAshayA pipIlikA cumbati candra mandalam ||"
    Siva was separated from Sati, and was despondent, He lay down on the mountain Himalaya. Thinking that the moon in Siva's hair was nectar, an ant licked the moon to satisfy itself! " (Source: Maha Tapasvi- Life story of Kavyakantha Ganapati Muni, pub 2005, Ramanasram, India.)

Post a Comment



Blogger Template by Blogcrowds